"Nobody calls me chicken!"

--Marty McFly, Back to the Future Part II

Martin Seamus "Marty" McFly Sr. (or simply Marty) is the main protagonist of the worldwide phenonemon 80s' classic, Back to the Future. In-universe, he is the world's second time traveler (after Einstein), the first to travel backwards in time and the first human to travel through time. He is best friends with Dr. Emmett Brown, who unveiled his first working invention to him.

Why He Rocks

  1. Marty is the noblest character in the entire series, as expected from a classic cinema protagonists.
  2. He's normerally very sweet and friendly, but he still has a hell of a right hook and won't hesitate to use it.
  3. Character development. His self-confidence and common sense seems to have improved after the events of Part I.
    • In the first film, when he's a newbie to time travel, he's very naive and impulsive, and for the first half of the second film he remains the same.
    • After an unsuspecting trip to the year 2015 goes horribly wrong and Marty accidentally gets his dad shot by Biff, he finally starts to take the dangers of time travel seriously and he grows significantly more cynical about the adventures in time he and Doc have by the third and final film.
  4. His, erm... unusual sleeping position.
  5. He often uses his quick wits as much as his physical ability to solve his problems.
  6. In the first film, Doc sacrifices himself to save Marty from the Libyans, and Marty returns the favor by ensuring that he gets the news of his impending death. Throughout the entire trilogy, they're by each others' sides, protecting each other and providing the fandom with many crowning moments of heartwarming.

Trivia

  • Eric Stoltz was originally cast to play the role of Marty McFly. Fox was the first choice of Zemeckis and Gale, but was committed to NBC's hit television show, Family Ties.
    • When the show's producer, Gary David Goldberg, was approached in 1984, he was not willing to let Fox appear in a movie while also shooting Family Ties.
      • After Zemeckis and Gale had filmed a large portion of the scenes with Stoltz, and were not happy with the results, they approached Goldberg again. Goldberg agreed to let Fox work on both the show and the film at the same time, with the condition that the show had to come first.
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